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5 OKR examples for Product Owner

What are Product Owner OKRs?

The Objective and Key Results (OKR) framework is a simple goal-setting methodology that was introduced at Intel by Andy Grove in the 70s. It became popular after John Doerr introduced it to Google in the 90s, and it's now used by teams of all sizes to set and track ambitious goals at scale.

Creating impactful OKRs can be a daunting task, especially for newcomers. Shifting your focus from projects to outcomes is key to successful planning.

We've tailored a list of OKRs examples for Product Owner to help you. You can look at any of the templates below to get some inspiration for your own goals.

If you want to learn more about the framework, you can read our OKR guide online.

Our Product Owner OKRs examples

We've added many examples of Product Owner Objectives and Key Results, but we did not stop there. Understanding the difference between OKRs and projects is important, so we also added examples of strategic initiatives that relate to the OKRs.

Hope you'll find this helpful!

OKRs to enhance maturity and capabilities of Product Owners

  • ObjectiveEnhance maturity and capabilities of Product Owners
  • Key ResultImplement peer-based feedback system to improve Product Owners' performance
  • TaskDesign a structured and anonymous peer-review feedback form
  • TaskIntegrate peer-review feedback system into performance evaluations
  • TaskTrain Product Owners on giving and receiving feedback
  • Key ResultIncrease Product Owners' certification rate by 30%
  • TaskSchedule regular certification exam preparation sessions
  • TaskDevelop a comprehensive in-house owners' certification training program
  • TaskImplement incentives for achieving certification
  • Key ResultConduct 2 advanced level training sessions for all Product Owners
  • TaskPrepare comprehensive materials for two sessions
  • TaskSchedule and conduct two advanced training sessions
  • TaskIdentify topics relevant to advanced Product Owner training

OKRs to enhance Product Owners' competency for optimal efficiency

  • ObjectiveEnhance Product Owners' competency for optimal efficiency
  • Key ResultAchieve 15% reduction in project execution timeframe through refined operational procedures
  • TaskIdentify areas for refinement to increase efficiency
  • TaskImplement refined procedures and monitor improvement
  • TaskEvaluate current operational procedures for underperformance
  • Key ResultIncrease Product Owners' workflow consistency by 20% via targeted training
  • TaskIdentify areas of inconsistency in current workflow
  • TaskDevelop targeted training addressing identified shortcomings
  • TaskImplement this training and monitor impact
  • Key ResultRaise Product Owners' productivity metrics by 10% through effective performance tracking
  • TaskImplement a comprehensive performance tracking system for Product Owners
  • TaskRegularly review and analyze productivity metrics with Product Owners
  • TaskProvide performance improvement training sessions for Product Owners

OKRs to allocate resources to refactor high-priority tech debt

  • ObjectiveReduce technical debt by allocating resources effectively
  • Key ResultImplement best practices to avoid future high-priority tech debt accumulation
  • Key ResultAchieve a reduction in high-priority tech debt items by 25%
  • Key ResultEstablish a clear plan for refactoring high-priority tech debt items
  • Key ResultPrioritize high-priority tech debt items for resource allocation

OKRs to drive Agile Culture and Continuous Improvement

  • ObjectiveDrive Agile Culture and Continuous Improvement
  • Key ResultIncrease employee engagement by 15% through the use of feedback loops and open communication channels
  • Key ResultIncrease team agility by implementing Scrum methodology and conducting regular retrospectives
  • TaskTrain team members on Scrum principles and methodology through workshops and coaching sessions
  • TaskAdapt sprint planning sessions to prioritize tasks and assign them according to team members' strengths
  • TaskImplement Scrum artifacts like backlog, user stories, and Sprint boards to enhance team agility
  • TaskConduct weekly retrospectives to reflect on previous sprints and identify areas of improvement
  • Key ResultImplement an employee recognition program to encourage and reward continuous improvement efforts
  • Key ResultAchieve a 20% decrease in time-to-market for new product releases through streamlined processes

OKRs to reduce critical tech debt by 50% in six months

  • ObjectiveMinimize tech debt
  • Key ResultDevelop a plan of action to address targeted tech debt items
  • Key ResultPrioritize critical tech debt items
  • Key ResultConduct a thorough tech debt analysis
  • Key ResultImplement new development standards to prevent tech debt accumulation

Best practices for managing your Product Owner OKRs

Generally speaking, your objectives should be ambitious yet achievable, and your key results should be measurable and time-bound (using the SMART framework can be helpful). It is also recommended to list strategic initiatives under your key results, as it'll help you avoid the common mistake of listing projects in your KRs.

Here are a couple of best practices extracted from our OKR implementation guide 👇

Tip #1: Limit the number of key results

Having too many OKRs is the #1 mistake that teams make when adopting the framework. The problem with tracking too many competing goals is that it will be hard for your team to know what really matters.

We recommend having 3-4 objectives, and 3-4 key results per objective. A platform like Tability can run audits on your data to help you identify the plans that have too many goals.

Tability Insights DashboardTability's audit dashboard will highlight opportunities to improve OKRs

Tip #2: Commit to the weekly check-ins

Setting good goals can be challenging, but without regular check-ins, your team will struggle to make progress. We recommend that you track your OKRs weekly to get the full benefits from the framework.

Being able to see trends for your key results will also keep yourself honest.

Tability Insights DashboardTability's check-ins will save you hours and increase transparency

Tip #3: No more than 2 yellow statuses in a row

Yes, this is another tip for goal-tracking instead of goal-setting (but you'll get plenty of OKR examples below). But, once you have your goals defined, it will be your ability to keep the right sense of urgency that will make the difference.

As a rule of thumb, it's best to avoid having more than 2 yellow/at risk statuses in a row.

Make a call on the 3rd update. You should be either back on track, or off track. This sounds harsh but it's the best way to signal risks early enough to fix things.

Building your own Product Owner OKRs with AI

While we have some examples below, it's likely that you'll have specific scenarios that aren't covered here. There are 2 options available to you.

Best way to track your Product Owner OKRs

Quarterly OKRs should have weekly updates to get all the benefits from the framework. Reviewing progress periodically has several advantages:

  • It brings the goals back to the top of the mind
  • It will highlight poorly set OKRs
  • It will surface execution risks
  • It improves transparency and accountability

Spreadsheets are enough to get started. Then, once you need to scale you can use a proper OKR platform to make things easier.

A strategy map in TabilityTability's Strategy Map makes it easy to see all your org's OKRs

If you're not yet set on a tool, you can check out the 5 best OKR tracking templates guide to find the best way to monitor progress during the quarter.

More Product Owner OKR templates

We have more templates to help you draft your team goals and OKRs.

OKRs resources

Here are a list of resources to help you adopt the Objectives and Key Results framework.