OKR Examples

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Marketing

OKRs for Marketing Teams

Focus

Acquisition
Activation
Retention
Referral
Revenue

Key Questions

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Which channel(s) do we want to focus on this quarter?

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Do we need to improve our relationship with Sales/Growth/Product?

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Are we happy with our acquisition costs?

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How can we mix big bets with low-hanging fruits?

The Marketing team should focus mostly on the top of the funnel. Their job is to generate interest and make people aware of what your company has to offer.

The focus may seem narrow, but there’s no shortage of plays that a Marketing team can work on. You can launch campaigns, do paid advertising, sponsor conferences, leverage content, etc. Having a good set of OKRs will help the team converge their efforts towards specific outcomes, and it will also make it easier for them to sync with the rest of the business.

Example of Marketing OKRs

You'll find below an example built around a fictitious company. Your OKRs should move from quarter to quarter and map to your company's reality – that's why we thought it's best to illustrate things as a case study that you can take inspiration from.

Scenario

Askawoof is a startup building a platform to help companies run customer satisfaction surveys. Their Marketing team decides to focus on content for the next quarter to generate new leads and raise their SEO ranking.

General advice

Some of your objectives will be hard to achieve within a quarter. This is the case here with SEO improvements. So what should you do? The answer is to find leading indicators of success. You might not be able to observe progress on your core goals, but there might be ways for you to make sure that you're on the right path.

In the example below, the Marketing team balances things by adding some KRs that can be tracked weekly (number of backlinks), and other ones that may take longer to see results (search rankings).

Their OKRs

Objective

Become the #1 online resource for the problem we solve

Key result

Secure 15 high-quality backlinks from industry influencers & publications

Key result

Rank in top 5 traffic share for top domain keyword on Google

Key result

Get 30% more organic visits to our online guides

Objective

Turn content into a lead-generation machine

Key result

Increase content click-through from 1,500 to 3000 clicks monthly

Key result

25% of our customers find us through content (vs 12% today)

Best practices for tracking OKRs

#1 Make it part of the team rituals

OKRs won't be of much help if you're not keeping an eye on them. Staying focused and aligned starts by adopting a simple routine with the team.

  • Monday: review progress on OKRs as a team, then look at your roadmap.
  • Monday-Friday: work on projects.
  • Friday: demos.

Start your Monday by looking at outcomes first (OKRs) and then outputs (roadmap). This will make sure that roadmaps discussions are centered around the most pressing issues.

#2 Make sure everyone can see trends

A common mistake for tracking OKRs is to use a table where you replace values in cells with the most recent update.

Not seeing trends can give you a false sense of security. You may be above the target line today, but the overall trend might be going the wrong way. So make sure that you have a simple way to understand if you're getting off track.

A simple progress chart can do wonders to help you understand if you're getting off track.

#3 Automate your OKRs process

OKRs will most likely cause friction as you expand their use within your organization:

  • Team leads have to send reminders every week.
  • People have to scramble through spreadsheets to find their goals.
  • Reports need to be handcrafted for leadership.
  • There's a general lack of consistency in implementation.

You can greatly simplify things by adopting a platform like Tability that will automate most of the OKRs tracking and make progress easy to see.

Tability can help you automate OKRs
Turning OKRs into a collaboration process with Tability

What other Marketing metrics can you use?

If you’re looking for some inspiration, here are some example of metrics that can be relevant for your Key Results.

Number of backlinks

How many sites link back to your content?

Keyword rankings

Where do you rank on specific requests?

Domain Authority Score (DA)

Indicates how likely your website is to rank high in search results.

Content shares

How often your content is shared online.

Cost Per Acquisition (CPA)

Cost Per Acquisition is the cost of acquiring a non-paying user.

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)

Customer Acquisition Cost is the cost of acquiring a paying customer.

Traffic

How many people are visiting your website, and how often do they do it?

Engagement

How do people interact with your content (it can be anything, from visits to specific sections to conversations in Intercom…)

Click-through rate

Rate of engagement with specific actions.

Leads generated / Marketing Qualified Leads (MQL)

How many users end up being interested in what you have to offer (demos booked, signups)

Conversion rate

Similar to click-through, but generally associated with a tangible result (signup, purchase…)